Sharing What I Find

Instructional Design and Technology in Education

Forwarding Eamil

Getting through to students through email can normally be a really efficient way to communicate with them. But you have to make sure that if the students aren’t using their official UA designated email or that they forward email received at this address to one that they check regularly. Right now with students at UAF using both @uaf.edu and @alaska.edu there is no one single place to manage how students direct their official UA email to an email that they will check. Plus those student who are enrolled in a degree program through UAA or UAS (or had been at one time) maintain their official UA email from that unit and are probably using @uaa.alaska.edu or @uas.alaska.edu

Here are the links (and/or instructions) for forwarding email for all the official options for email at the University of Alaska:

@alaska.edu
https://www.alaska.edu/google/
Click on the Mail link. Click Settings at the top of any Gmail page, and open the Forwarding and POP/IMAP tab. In the first section named, “Forwarding,’ enter the email address to which you’d like your messages forwarded. Select the action you’d like your messages to take from the drop-down menu. You can choose to keep Gmail’s copy of the message in your inbox, or you can send it automatically to All Mail or Trash. Click Save Changes

@uaf.edu
https://www.alaska.edu/oit/email/mail_forwarding.xml
Follow directions as listed

@uaa.alaska.edu
https://username.uaa.alaska.edu/
go to Change Other Account Attributes

@uas.alaska.edu
https://uascentral.uas.alaska.edu/online
This takes you to UASOnline – go to Edit Profile and edit your email in the Essential Information section.

Sorry this is all so complicated for you teaching distance courses — at least things are better today then they were in the past when students were often given a different email address from each of the main units and then had to maintain them all!

Author: Heidi Olson

Heidi enjoys working with content experts in developing eCampus courses to provide alternatives for students. Her other interests include faculty training in best practices for eCampus and researching eCampus tools to help fulfill learning outcomes. Having worked in the distance education arena for over 20 years, she has a wide range of experiences in supporting students and faculty as technology and pedagogy evolve.

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